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A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT New 4/29/15
 Survivor Newsletter MAY 2015
Hcvvo VA Hospital Schedule for 2015
REUNION CAMPGROUND MAP
HCVVO Fundraising and Events Schedule for 2015
The original Board of Directors in the early
1980's and what they done to start HCVVO.
Ride of the brotherhood, is dedicated to helping our homeless Veterans to include the ultimate homeless vet, the MIA. We have built a tribute trike, NEVER FORGET, on display at the September Reunion
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If you would like to make camping reservations at the Fairgrounds, Greentown Indiana for the September Reunion,contact is Mr. Larry Larowe and his cell phone number is , 765-419-3737.
Thank you for our Middle Eastern Vets
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8313 East 400 South Greentown Indiana 46936, phone 765 628 0297, fax 765 628 3068. Email vveterans@aol.com
HCVVO By Laws I
HCVVO Membership Form I
CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
HCVVO
CLICK HERE !
Howard County Vietnam Veterans Organization
33rd Vietnam and all Vets Reunion
September 17, 18, 19, 20.
GOLF CART RENTAL INFORMATION FOR THE 33RD ANNUAL REUNION, SEPTEMBER 2015
CLICK HERE
Your HCVVO Board of Directors
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HCVVO Message Board
Following a congressional mandate in 1983, the National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study (NVVRS) was conducted by the U.S. government to better understand the development of PTSD from the Vietnam War, as well as other problems.

The findings from this study were alarming. At the time of the study (middle to late 1980s), among Vietnam veterans, approximately 15% of men and 9% of women were found to currently have PTSD.

Approximately 30% of men and 27% of women had PTSD at some point in their life following Vietnam.These findings, obtained approximately a decade after the end of the Vietnam War, found that for many veterans, their PTSD had become a chronic (that is, persistent and long-lasting) condition.

The American Legion, and the State University of New York (SUNY) Downstate Medical Center surveyed 1,377 American Legionnaires who had served in Southeast Asia in the Vietnam War 14 years after their NVVRS interview in 1984.

The Long-Term Impact of PTSD

Their study found that over 3 decades after the Vietnam War, many veterans continued to experience problems with PTSD. At the initial interview, approximately 12% had PTSD. Fourteen years later, the rates of PTSD had dropped only slightly to approximately 11%. Those who had experienced high levels of combat exposure were most likely to have PTSD at both interviews.

Veterans who continued to have PTSD 14 years after their first interview were found to have considerably more psychological and social problems. They reported lower satisfaction with their marriage, sex life, and life in general. They also indicated having more parenting difficulties, higher divorce rates, lower happiness, and more physical health complaints, such as fatigue, aches, and colds. Veterans with chronic PTSD were also more likely to be smokers.

Getting Help for Chronic PTSD

The findings from this study suggest that people exposed to severe traumatic events (such as combat exposure) may be at risk for developing chronic PTSD, and persistent PTSD can have a tremendous negative effect on a person's life and physical health.

Even in cases of chronic PTSD, recovery can still occur. Therefore, whether you have been suffering from PTSD for a long time or recently developed the disorder, it is important to seek out treatment if you have PTSD. The Anxiety Disorder Association of America provides links to PTSD treaters in your area. You can also get specific information on PTSD and its treatment for veterans from the National Center for PTSD.


NEW JULY 4 2015
August 15, a very special
day at HCVVO.